U.S. Department of Defense

U.S. Department of Defense
Law Enforcement Agencies

Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS)

The United States Department of the Navy is a branch of the U.S. Department of Defense and has its own law enforcement agency called the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS). Its prime concern is to conduct investigations concerning the US Navy personnel and other threats to the national security. It succeeded the Naval Investigative Service that was established in 1966 that was composed of civilian special agents. These agents were later on classified as Excepted civil servants. The marine corps criminal investigation division was later on integrated with the NCIS. Its special agents are deployed in the so-called floating city because they usually stay in aircraft carriers.

The Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) operates its duties and responsibilities within the authority of the Secretary of the Navy. Its special agents are highly skilled and professionals, with training from the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Georgia. Among the duties and powers of the NCIS special agents include the following:

  • Counter a full range counterintelligence operations and activities
  • Provide anti-terrorism activities
  • Give an advice to the Commandant of the Marine Corps
  • Neutralize terrorist activities
  • Provide logistics, intelligence and communication support
  • Carry firearms primarily the standard issued pistol of SIG Sauer P229R DAK. They may also carry the SIG Sauer P239 DAK.
  • Crime scene examination
  • Interrogation of witnesses or suspected criminals
  • Conduct investigations on the high seas or even in remote locations

The authority of the NCIS to investigate crimes is in line with its mission to provide intelligence, security and exercise law enforcement responsibilities. They are also tasked to investigate deaths of personnel of the Department of Navy. Among the various crimes that the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) investigates include the following:

  • Terrorism
  • Potential threat to national security
  • Homicide
  • Counterintelligence
  • Espionage
  • Sabotage
  • Crimes committed by its personnel in violation of the Uniform Code of Military Justice

US Air Force (USAF OSI)

The US Air Force is a branch of the U.S. Department of Defense and has an Office of Special Investigation (USAF OSI) was established on August 1, 1948 with the purpose of consolidating the investigating activities of the Air Force. As a federal law enforcement agency, the US Air Force (USAF OSI) conducts an independent criminal investigation and counterintelligence mission and directly reports to the Secretary of the Air Force. The department’s first Commander was Special Agent Joseph Carroll, who was then a senior FBI officer. Its operation is international and the department provides service operations that are different from the traditional chain of command observed in the military. It is mainly concerned with the protection of the national security.

The powers and authority of the US Air Force (USAF OSI) are far reaching, as they can operate globally and in any domain. Its special agents are highly trained with some specialized trainings required involving forensics, firearms and other weapons, anti-terrorism techniques and surveillance detection. Its military services include the exercise of the following powers, duties and authorities:

  • Provides military service for the Department of Air Force
  • Detect and mitigate national threats
  • Provide global specialized services
  • Conduct counterintelligence operations
  • Conduct criminal investigations
  • Engage foreign enemies and threats
  • Provide aviation forces for both combat and service
  • Exercise offensive and defensive air operations
  • Technology protection
  • Carry firearms with 9x9mm SIG Sauer P228 as primary weapons carried by its special agents

The US Air Force (USAF OSI) is engaged in various investigations such as the following:

  • Economic crime investigations such as frauds
  • Terrorism
  • Intelligence threats
  • Espionage
  • Technology infiltrations
  • Drug use and trafficking
  • Black market activities
  • Cybercrimes
  • Sexual assault
  • Murder and homicide
  • Robbery
  • Rape
  • Major burglaries
  • Appropriated and non-appropriated fund activities
  • Technology transfers
  • Compromise of the Air Force Test materials

US Army CID

The US Army Criminal Investigation Command (US Army CID) is the primary investigating arm of the US Army. Its main functions include the conduct of different investigations to which the Army is a party of interest. The US Army CID has various command centers across the globe. Modern investigative techniques are employed in the conduct of their investigations and its main concern is to be present where criminal activities are taking place. Their operations are usually centralized and their military missions are usually autonomous. Its special agents report directly through the Commanding General who then reports to the Army Chief of Staff and Secretary.

The US Army CID is an independent investigating body of the US Army and its special agents are vested upon the authority, duties and powers to exercise the following:

  • Collect, analyze and obtain intelligence on criminal activities
  • Perform service operations to protect the nation and its citizens
  • Provide assistance to the DoD investigative body in forensics
  • Keep and maintain Army criminal records
  • Investigate the death of soldiers with certain exempting circumstances
  • To apprehend violators of the law
  • Deploy contingency support in all US military operations worldwide
  • Carry firearms, primarily the 9mm SIG Sauer P228 as a sidearm and the M4 carbine when deployed to a combat environment

The US Army CID may investigate criminal activities and provide support in the investigation of the other US intelligence bodies whenever needed. Some of the crimes its special agents may investigate include the following:

  • Drug trafficking
  • Procurement fraud
  • Murders and homicide
  • Armed robbery
  • Sexual assault
  • War crimes
  • Terrorism
  • Criminal intelligence
  • Subversive activities
  • Crimes committed against the coalition forces
  • Crimes committed against host nation personnel
  • Sabotage
  • Profiteering
  • Diversion of supplies and equipment

US Department of Defense CID

The US Department of Defense has its own criminal investigation division that serves as its criminal investigating body that is under the Inspector General of the US Department of Defense. The US Department of Defense CID is also known as the Defense Criminal Investigative Service (DCIS) of the Department of Defense that is mainly tasked to protect the military personnel who are responsible for the conduct of various criminal investigations. The department was established in 1981 pursuant to the amendments made to the Inspector General Act of 1978 and it forms part of the federal law enforcement department of the United States. While the department has special agents conducting the criminal investigations, the major investigations are generally led by Deputy Inspector General for Investigations.

The US Department of Defense CID has special agents who are highly skilled and well trained officers who are vested upon the law with the following duties and authorities:

  • To execute the law under the supervision of the Department of Defense
  • To serve warrants
  • Make an arrest even without warrant for any crimes committed in the presence of its special agent
  • To carry firearms
  • Conduct, coordinate and supervise criminal investigation activities
  • Its special agents may also be engaged in criminal investigations involving the military department
  • Render leadership and coordinated efforts in recommending policies that will prevent abuse in the operations and programs of the Department of Defense

US Department of Defense CID is a criminal investigative arm of the Department of Defense with the mission of giving priorities to the investigation of the following criminal activities:

  • Bribery
  • Fraud
  • Illegal transfer of defense technology
  • Defective and substandard weapon systems
  • Computer intrusions
  • Cyber crimes
  • Corruption
  • Health care fraud
  • Different types of financial crimes
  • Counterfeiting
  • Illegal export of weapons and equipment
  • Organized international criminal organizations
  • Threats to the national security